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Sunday, February 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of The histories, with an English translation by W.R. Paton. found in the catalog.

The histories, with an English translation by W.R. Paton.

In six volumes. Volume 3

by Polybius

  • 180 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by W. Heinemann in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History, Ancient,
  • Rome -- History -- Republic, 510-30 B.C.,
  • Greece -- History.

  • About the Edition

    Greek with facing English translation

    Edition Notes

    SeriesThe Loeb classical library. [Greek authors]
    ContributionsPaton, W. R. 1857-1921
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA4391 A2 1922
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23304146M
    OCLC/WorldCa685144

    The united armies gave battle to the Romans near Lake Vadimon, and in this battle most of the Etruscans were cut to pieces while only quite a few of the Boii escaped. In this action Gaius the Consul fell in the mellay fighting with desperate courage, The histories his head was brought to the Celtic kings; but the Roman cavalry, after a stubborn struggle, at length overmastered the enemy and gained possession of the hill. Again, it must have been to all present, and still is to us, a matter of doubt whether the Celts, with the enemy advancing on them from both sides, were more dangerously situated, or, on the contrary, more effectively, since at one and the same time they were fighting against both their enemies and were protecting themselves in the rear from both, while, above all, they were absolutely cut off from retreat or any prospect of escape in the case of defeat, this being the peculiarity of this two-faced formation. Four years later the Gauls made a league with the Samnites, and engaging the Romans in the territory of Camerinum inflicted on them considerable loss; meanwhile the Romans, determined on avenging their reverse, advanced again a few days after with all their legions, and attacking the Gauls and Samnites in the territory of Sentinum, put the greater number of them to the sword and compelled the rest to take precipitate flight each to their separate homes.

    O'Faolin, Julia and Lauro Martines, eds. He had largely increased the power of Carthage, not so much by military action as by friendly intercourse with the chiefs. We must therefore look upon this as the initiator and cause of that union that has established the present prosperity of the Peloponnese. This movement of the Gauls contributed in no small measure to the rapid and unimpeded subjugation of Spain by the Carthaginians; for the Romans, as I said above, regarded this matter as of more urgency, since the danger was on their flank, and were compelled to neglect the affairs of Spain until they had dealt with the Gauls.

    It is a vital achievement of the first importance despite the incomplete state in which all but the first five of its original forty books have reached us. It describes the rise of Rome to the destruction of Carthage and the domination of Greece by Rome. With an English translation by W.R. Paton. book thought it necessary to speak at some length on this subject in order to show how foolish the Epirots were, and that no people, if wise, should ever admit a garrison stronger than their own forces, especially if composed of barbarians. In Rome itself there was a reserve force, ready for any war-contingency, consisting of twenty thousand foot and fifteen thousand horse, all Roman citizens, and thirty thousand foot and two thousand horse furnished by the allies. This was solely due to the foresight of the tribunes, the Consul Flaminius being thought to have mismanaged the battle by deploying his force at the very edge of the river-bank and thus rendering impossible a tactical movement peculiar to the Romans, as he left the lines no room to fall back gradually. From the moment that he assumed the command, it was evident from the measures he took that he intended to make war on Rome, as indeed he finished by doing, and that very shortly.


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The histories, with an English translation by W.R. Paton. by Polybius Download PDF Ebook

But finally, attacked from higher ground and on their flank by the Roman cavalry, which rode down the hill and charged them vigorously, the Celtic infantry were cut to pieces where they stood, their cavalry taking to flight.

In Book VI Polybius digresses into an explanation of the The histories constitution and he shows it to be mixed. The hilly ground with sufficient soil on both slopes of the Alps, that on the north towards the Rhone and that towards the plain I have been describing, is inhabited in the former case by the Transalpine Gauls and in the latter by the Taurisci, Agones and several other barbarous tribes.

Patrologiae cursus completus, Series With an English translation by W.R. Paton. book, vols. The united armies gave battle to the Romans near Lake Vadimon, and in this battle most of the Etruscans were cut to pieces while only quite a few of the Boii escaped.

When day broke, both armies drew up their forces in front of the town and engaged. How then can they be acquitted of the charge of causing their own misfortunes? On the Consuls learning of this, Marcus Claudius set off in haste with the cavalry and a small body of infantry to relieve the besieged if possible.

And in this case the Greeks with an English translation by W.R. Paton. book have been amply justified in their censure of the Epirots.

First of all they had been expelled from their own country by a general movement of their fellow-countrymen owing to their having betrayed their own friends and kinsmen. For they had observed from with an English translation by W.R. Paton. book battles that Gauls in general are most formidable and spirited in their first onslaught, while still fresh, and that, from the way their swords are made, as has been already explained, only the first cut takes effect; after this they at once assume the shape of a strigil, being so much bent both length-wise and side-wise that unless the men are given leisure to rest them on the ground and set them straight with the foot, the second blow is quite ineffectual.

Up to now, these principles of government had merely existed amongst them, but had resulted in no practical steps worthy of mention for the increase of the Achaean power, since the country seemed unable to produce a statesman worthy of those principles, anyone who showed a tendency to act so being thrown into the dark and hampered either by the Lacedaemonian power or still more by that of Macedon.

Book Details. Gaius Flaminius was the originator of this popular policy, which we must pronounce to have been, one may say, the first step in the demoralization of the populace, as well as the cause of the war with the Gauls which followed.

So there was great alacrity in obeying orders. For this edition, W. From the moment that he assumed the command, it was evident from the measures he took that he intended to make war on Rome, as indeed he finished by doing, and that very shortly. The Roman shields, it should be added, were far more serviceable for defence and their swords for attack, the Gaulish sword being only good for a cut and not for a thrust.

He concludes that the success of the Roman state was based on their mixed constitution, which combined elements of a democracyaristocracyand monarchy. However, as it was, they gained a decisive victory by their own skill and valour, as I said, and returned to Rome with a quantity of booty and many trophies.

King Agron, when the flotilla returned and his officers gave him an account of the battle, was so overjoyed at the thought of having beaten the Aetolians, then the proudest of the peoples, that he took to carousals and other convivial excesses, from which he fell into a pleurisy that ended fatally in a few days.

Polybius' overall theme is how and why the Romans spread their power as they did. The Illyrian forces, highly elated by their success, continued the siege with more security and confidence, and the Corcyreans, whose hopes were crushed by the repulse of their allies, after enduring the siege for a short time longer, came to terms with the Illyrians, receiving a garrison under the command of Demetrius of Pharos.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Polybius is in six volumes. There they landed, to the consternation of the inhabitants, and laid siege to the city. On reaching the flat ground, it takes a turn to the East and flows through the plain, falling into the Adriatic by two mouths.

The main part of his history covers the years BCE, describing the rise of Rome, her destruction of Carthage, and her eventual domination of the Greek world. For Latin readers a useful feature is that all the Greek texts have side by side Latin translations - not always reliable, however, and an easy target of persnickety reviewers.

Pitra, J. For the people whose original and ancestral name this was are distinguished neither by the extent of their territory, nor by the number of their cities, nor by exceptional wealth or the exceptional valour of their citizens.

In the next place I set myself to describe how the mercenaries mutinied against Carthage and set ablaze the so-called Libyan war; I described all the terrible atrocities committed in this war, all its dramatic surprises, and their issues, until it ended in the final triumph of Carthage.

When the Celts were near Telamon in Etruria, their advanced foragers encountered the advance guard of Gaius and were made prisoners.

The battle resulted in the defeat of the Epirots, many of whom were killed and still more taken prisoners, the rest escaping in the direction of Atintania.Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

The Histories (Paton translation)/Book II

Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers & Technology Music, Arts & Culture News with an English translation by W.R. Paton. book Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion. Librivox Free Audiobook.

Podcasts. Featured Full text of "The histories, with an English translation" See other formats. The Histories, Vol 6 book.

Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Polybius (born ca. BCE) of Megalopolis in the Peloponnese (/5.For this edition, W. R. Paton’s excellent translation, first published in pdf, has been thoroughly revised, the Büttner-Wobst Greek text corrected, and explanatory notes and a new introduction added, all reflecting the latest scholarship.May 19,  · The Histories (Paton translation) From Wikisource.

Jump to navigation Jump to search. For other English-language translations of this work, see The Histories (Polybius). The Histories (–27) by Polybius, translated by W. R.

The Histories (Paton translation)

Paton. information about this edition.The new translation by F.W. Walbank is based on the original ebook W.R. Paton but includes new Greek text, a more modern English, many more notes and nice bibliographies for further readings (Update on the bibliography-it is only in volume /5(3).